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  • Mary Schreiber Swenson Phd.

How COVID-19 has Opened Our Eyes to Seeking Healthcare Outside of Our Geographical Borders

Though the United States has long been touted as one of leading nations in healthcare across the world, many American citizens have become worn about by a lack of transparency in pricing and further limited by the country’s widening wealth gap have begun looking outside of their local area in favor of more cost-efficient care abroad or in other states with increasing momentum. Though 73 percent of U.S. adults once said they had great confidence in the country’s medical leaders during a survey taken in the midst of the American Golden Age in 1966, only 34 percent of Americans maintained this same faith in modern times, reveals a similar survey from 2012.


These numbers only grow when taking into account the United State’s diverse demographics, as many members of minority communities have expressed their inherent distrust in the U.S healthcare system’s adequate care of their medical needs. Indeed, with some four out of five of surveyed Latino, Black, Asian and Native American revealing they won’t to return to their previous health care providers after losing faith in them, and another one-third stating they actively avoid medical attention due to this same distrust, the United States’ melting-pot population has expressed clear issues with putting their wellbeing in the hands of the U.S. healthcare system.

Though the United States has long been touted as one of leading nations in healthcare across the world, many American citizens have become worn about by a lack of transparency in pricing and further limited by the country’s widening wealth gap have begun looking outside of their local area in favor of more cost-efficient care abroad or in other states with increasing momentum. Though 73 percent of U.S. adults once said they had great confidence in the country’s medical leaders during a survey taken in the midst of the American Golden Age in 1966, only 34 percent of Americans maintained this same faith in modern times, reveals a similar survey from 2012.


These numbers only grow when taking into account the United State’s diverse demographics, as many members of minority communities have expressed their inherent distrust in the U.S healthcare system’s adequate care of their medical needs. Indeed, with some four out of five of surveyed Latino, Black, Asian and Native American revealing they won’t to return to their previous health care providers after losing faith in them, and another one-third stating they actively avoid medical attention due to this same distrust, the United States’ melting-pot population has expressed clear issues with putting their wellbeing in the hands of the U.S. healthcare system.


Part of this can be explained by the United States’ privatized insurance and healthcare infrastructure. While other first-world nations, like the United Kingdom and Sweden, boast popular and efficient public healthcare options, the United States’ wellness sector has been built off the back of privatization and, as a result, 65.8 percent of American adults currently enrolled in private healthcare systems. And within this privatized structure protected by the Uniform Trade Secrets Act of 1979, a lack of clarity in pricing and unviable public alternatives have caused many Americans to spend $111 more than necessary per month on their coverage plans.


“This is why we’re seeing so many Americans turn to travel for treatment and medical tourism for their wellness needs,” says ​​Mary Schreiber Swenson, Ph.D, the CEO of MyMedChoices and thought-leader in medical tourism and travel for treatment. “By looking at options in other states or even abroad, patients can potentially solve their health issues with the quality treatments they’re used to, but at a fraction of the cost.”


“Plus, those concerned with the diagnosis determined by their doctor can seek a much-needed second opinion to confirm they’re on the right track with treatment,” adds Swenson.


Considering the United States’ top 1 percent took $50 trillion in capital from the nation’s bottom 90 percent during the covid-19 pandemic, only expanding the wealth gap during already trying-economic times, its anticipated that more and more Americans will begin seeking affordable healthcare through medical tourism and travel for treatment as the world attempts to move forward from the pandemic. For more information please contact mary@mymedchoices.com or visit our website at www.mymedchoices.com


Part of this can be explained by the United States’ privatized insurance and healthcare infrastructure. While other first-world nations, like the United Kingdom and Sweden, boast popular and efficient public healthcare options, the United States’ wellness sector has been built off the back of privatization and, as a result, 65.8 percent of American adults currently enrolled in private healthcare systems. And within this privatized structure protected by the Uniform Trade Secrets Act of 1979, a lack of clarity in pricing and unviable public alternatives have caused many Americans to spend $111 more than necessary per month on their coverage plans.


“This is why we’re seeing so many Americans turn to travel for treatment and medical tourism for their wellness needs,” says ​​Mary Schreiber Swenson, Ph.D, the CEO of MyMedChoices and thought-leader in medical tourism and travel for treatment. “By looking at options in other states or even abroad, patients can potentially solve their health issues with the quality treatments they’re used to, but at a fraction of the cost.”


“Plus, those concerned with the diagnosis determined by their doctor can seek a much-needed second opinion to confirm they’re on the right track with treatment,” adds Swenson.


Considering the United States’ top 1 percent took $50 trillion in capital from the nation’s bottom 90 percent during the covid-19 pandemic, only expanding the wealth gap during already trying-economic times, its anticipated that more and more Americans will begin seeking affordable healthcare through medical tourism and travel for treatment as the world attempts to move forward from the pandemic. For more information please contact mary@mymedchoices.com or visit our website at www.mymedchoices.com


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